The Log Bar Training Guide

THE LOG BAR TRAINING GUIDE
At last, An Excellent Training Guide for an Excellent Piece of Equipment

It is my feeling that every piece of sophisticated training equipment should come with a training guide… a road map of sorts. My reasoning behind this is simple: if you are someone who may not be experienced with that particular piece of equipment then you would be able to learn the important basic training ideas and methods for using it right out of the box.

Sure, you’ll come up with your own tweaks here and there as you use it, but having some basic instruction from the get-go is always very helpful.

… And if you’re someone with a little more experience then you would be able to check out the guide and add to your training knowledge repertoire by finding out some of the other ways of using it that you may not have even realized. Either way, a good training guide is an invaluable tool on your way to strength success and it is our goal to eventually have such a guide for all the pieces of unique strength equipment that we feature.

Today, we are going to start off with the first in the series and that is a training guide devoted to one of our most popular pieces of equipment: Dr. Ken’s Log Bar Trainer.

In the past we had a very basic training guide available for Dr. Ken’s Log Bar and while it did a decent job of illustrating some of the basic exercises, we felt that a more detailed training guide for this piece of equipment would be preferable.

So, we got on the phone with Dr. Ken and asked if he thought so too… he did… and then we went to work. We took some new pictures, fleshed out many of the exercises descriptions, added some more sample workouts and even contacted some of our other friends (see who they were below) who have been training with the Log Bar for a while now to see some of the ways they had been incorporating it in their program.

And when all was said and done, the new Log Bar training guide turned out spectacularly well. And yes, the information in this guide can be used with just about any parallel handle pressing bar. Keep reading for all the highlights and topics covered:


The Log Bar Training Guide is fully illustrated with training tips and sample workouts


The Log Bar can be a very effective alternative to a straight bar for building upper-body strength. You’ll want to check out Dr. Ken’s Log Bar Bench Press Program which starts on page 33


Several different workout options are listed for training with the Log Bar. This is a look at Dr. Ken’s “Single Exercise Emphasis” section
  • A Look at the “Original” Log Bar and how the modern Log Bar came to be
  • Why the Dr. Ken Log Bar is preferable to a Wooden Log
  • NINE Log Bar upper-body exercises (not including variations) which can be performed with the Log Bar
  • Notes on lockouts, heavy partials and rack work with the Log bar
  • Details on the specific Log Bar exercise used with great success by many top college football programs
  • A unique grip exercise which can be performed with the Log Bar
  • FIVE Log Bar “Complex” Workouts for hitting the upper and lower body with a minimum of movements
  • 5 Log Bar Sample workouts utilizing the Log Bar and other basic equipment
  • Dr. Ken’s 6-week Log Bar Bench Press Improvement Program
  • The “Single Exercise” Workout routine – for when you have limited equipment

The Log Bar Training Guide is fully illustrated with training tips and sample workouts The Log Bar can be a very effective alternative to a straight bar for building upper-body strength. You’ll want to check out Dr. Ken’s Log Bar Bench Press Program Several different workout options are listed for training with the Log Bar. This is a look at Dr. Ken’s “Single Exercise Emphasis” section

  • My two favorite Log Bar exercises and how I use them in my workouts
  • An example of my most recent training routine
  • What to do when you hit a training plateau
  • Log Bar training for Stone lifting by Pat “Human Vise” Povilaitis
  • The Log Bar Standing Press Program by Brooks Kubik

es, that’s right, in addition to Dr. Ken and myself, our good friend Pat “Human Vise” Povilaitis and Brooks “Dinoman” Kubik have also contributed Log Bar training information on their favorite workouts. Those are some pretty strong hombres and you are definitely going to want to see what they have to offer.

As you can see, there is a lot of training information packed into this instructional guide… the basic exercises, sample workouts, training ideas… if you want to get the most out of your Log Bar, you simply need to have this guide as a part of your library. Now, you can order the guide separately if you wish but also keep in mind that when you order a Dr. Ken Log Bar from us, we will include a copy of this training guide absolutely FREE.

This is the only training guide of its kind. You may order your guide, or your Log Bar (or preferably both) using the red button below. We have several cases of the new Log Bar guides available and ready to ship. 55 Pages, lavishly illustrated, many workouts listed… If you want your copy, all you need to do is take action:

Welcome to FHS!

Welcome to FHS!
Back before my first year of High School and a few years later, just before I entered college they had a thing called “Orientation” – a program to make sure all the incoming freshman knew the way around: where their classes were … where to buy books … best places to eat … etc., etc. In that same spirit, and just so everyone is on the same page, we have put together an “Orientation” of sorts for learning your way around www.functionalhandstrength.com.

Here, you will find a few important things that you should know as you spend time navigating around this website. Please take a minute to familiarize yourself with the information found on this page.

Who’s running this joint?
First of all, who am I? My name is John Wood, that’s me over on the left doing a few curls.

As you have probably guessed by now, I’ve got a pretty varied interest in training. I’m not going to say that I have “done it all” but I have certainly done many different kinds of training … thick bars … 20-rep squats … power rack work … heavy supports …. barrel lifting …. sand bag training …. sledge hammers … you know, the stuff that can make you strong as a bear… but also probably get you kicked out of most gyms (or, at the least, plenty of funny looks).

One of my great interests is in hand strength — which you also probably guessed by now, since that is the topic that this entire website is devoted to. I closed the famed Iron Mind #3 gripper since I was 15 years old, so I know a thing or two about developing hand strength.

When it comes to getting strong, hand strength is pretty important — you can’t lift a weight unless you can hold onto it — yet the fact of the matter os that specific hand and grip strength exercises are downplayed or even ignored in many programs — set of half-hearted wrist curls every now and then just aint going to get the job done

I think that’s a real shame, especially considering just how much strength potential there is in the grip and forearm muscles… but you have to know how to do it right which is where I come in.

The Mission Ahead
One of the reasons why you are reading this page is that you took the extra step and joined up to my email list — sweet! I’ve got a lot of things to share, much of it about grip training, but info on all kinds of other things. Grip training is one of the most important aspects of every workout, but it is also just *one* of the aspects, there are many other things to consider. These are the kinds of things that I cover through my daily emails.

Yes, I said “daily” — as in every day — and sometimes more than once a day. I’ve got a lot of interesting things to share: workouts … training tips … things I’m working on in my own training … mistakes I’ve made (and hopefully how I corrected them and learned something from making them) … readers’ questions … equipment questions and suggestions … new product announcements… as you can see, there are many important things to cover, much more than we could do by emailing once or twice a month. If you are passionate about something, then it makes sense to learn all you can about it so I believe all the information that I am going to send your way is a good thing.

One of the most important factors in training success is consistency and reading something about training each day goes a long way in keeping you on track.

Yes, I do mention and promote my hand and grip strength products in these emails. If there is a strength tool or training guide that will help you get to you want to go, I would be remiss if I didn’t make you aware of it. You certainly don’t have to purchase anything from me to stick around, but I believe that our products have a lot to offer so I have no problem with shouting their merits far and wide, do you may at least want to have a look … and though it breaks my cold, dead heart, if you would like to unsubscribe from our e-mail list at any time, there is an unsubscribe link located at the bottom of every one of my daily e-mails.

This would also be a good time to mention that every page of our website is secure, and your information is never shared with anyone for any reason in case you might be wondering.
Questions and Answers
As you might guess, I get a lot of questions sent my way… If you have a question on a piece of equipment, you’ll want to have a look at this section of the site we also have some frequently asked questions on this page. The info pages for respective products often contain a lot of answers to basic questions so my advice would be to read those thoroughly first and also search the site. Questions on products, ordering or anything else having to do with customer service are addressed immediately by our staff… E-mails received on weekends and after our usual business hours will be answered promptly during the next business day.

What about training questions? My in-box is filled with them each day. It would be impossible for me to answer them all, so in order to help the greatest number of people, those are covered through my daily emails. You’ll also want to check out my training blog.
Doing Some Business
My guess is that you have probably done your fair share of ordering stuff through various online sources and our corner of the web is pretty typical in that regard. We get orders out as quickly as we can as a matter of principle — the faster we get your items into your hands, the quicker you can start using them to get stronger. We cover a lot of material on ordering in our Help Desk area. Please feel free to drop us a line by phone or email if you have any questions on anything or need any assistance, we’re happy to help any way we can.

Whew! that should about cover it — at least for now. Look for a cool grip workout from me in your mailbox tomorrow.

Train hard,

John Wood

Testimonials

Testimonials

Hi John,

The best thing I can say is that you have terrific service which is the heart of a successful business. The latest item that I ordered from Functional Hand Strength was a book that I ordered over the internet on Monday and had it in my hands on Wednesday. That is excellent service and that has been my experience with items that I have ordered from Functional Hand Strength.

George Loomis



Mr. Wood,

I enjoy getting your emails. The journey to bettering myself is one I hope to be on for quite a while. Every positive, balance and spirit building insight I am fortunate enough to come into contact with (and hopefully absorb and use with the best of intentions) I am grateful for. Thanks for all that you’ve shared. The ‘Captains of Crush’ hand grippers have been excellent. I was a discus thrower at the University of Nebraska and currently train in submission grappling and some other arts and move furniture for a living. I train with the #2 and #3 grippers. They, along with your tips and emails have been a wonderful addition to my training.

Eliot Partridge
Austin, Texas



John Wood has learned well from his dad Kim. I always felt the service we received from Hammer Strength was top of the line. I feel the same about Functional Hand Strength and the excellent service we receive from John on his line of unique products. Keep up the good work.

Herb Brogan
Lumen Christi High School
Jackson, Michigan




In terms of Functional, result producing training, John Wood’s sites collectively provide the answer to many training problems and questions. Functional training seems to have got lost in the mix of the new and scientific. Proven effective training systems can never die out, and through John’s websites, books and products, many people are gaining top rate Bodyweight, Grip and Weight Training information. Each website covers all of the essentials to become strong and healthy in many different ways, including some lesser known but paramount aspects such as grip, neck, lower back, leg strength and endurance training. They also provide you with the tools to achieve such health with products such as trap bars, climbing ropes and thick bars. All in all Functional Hand Strength and its related sites are all one needs to develop strength, endurance and all around fitness.

Lee Potier,
Croydon, United Kingdom




Dear Mr. Wood,

I’ve been doing business with you for a few years and have enjoyed prompt service, good books, and quality products. I came upon your site by accident, seeking information on steel bending a few years back, and have made progress in that area. I don’t think I’ll ever progress to the level of a Dennis Rogers or Pat Povolaitis, but people tend to be astounded, when I, a middle age middle weight, can bend a short piece of stock with apparent ease, and a muscular heavyweight in their twenties can’t put a kink into it with maximal effort. So, I have made definite progress over the years, and want to thank you for the products and information, which have made this possible. Best wishes to you and everyone at Functional Hand Strength for the coming year.

Thanks!

Richie Hallihan



I have ordered numerous equipment (log bar, fat bar, Bulgarian sand bags, C.O.C. grippers, jump ropes, super gripper, TRX) through John Wood and his website for my school or personal use and everything has always been delivered quickly, in great working condition. That is a credit to him and his staff. I also look forward to his no nonsense emails on training. It is refreshing to hear from somebody not selling gimmicks but sensible HARD WORK!

Ryan Ash
Howell High School
Teacher, Football and Strength coach
Howell, Michigan




John, Simple yet perfect! Keep em’ coming. By the way, I just started training an NHL defenseman who plays for the Saint Louis Blues. He did his first grip training workout today, and couldn’t move his fingers for a while after he finished. He said it was the most intense forearm work he’d ever done, and it only took about five minutes. Thanks again John for introducing me to the Captains of Crush Grippers.

Craig Huntington
The Huntington Fitness Company
Hanover, Massachusetts
781-826-0302




John Wood has an unbelievable amount of grip training knowledge. I only got to see the tip of the iceberg for what he has to offer… you won’t be disappointed with what John has to teach you. I know I wasn’t.”

Keith Dozeman
Martial Artist
Kalamazoo, Michigan


About Us

About Us
www.functionalhandstrength.com is the place for information on hand strength and unusual forms of training. Founded in January of 2005, FHS has quickly become one of the top strength websites on the Internet.
About John Wood
John Wood, a former defensive lineman for the University of Michigan football team, is well known throughout the strength world for his unusual feats of hand strength and his in-depth knowledge of many classical “lost” exercises such as the one-arm snatch and the bent press.

To date, his many grip strength accomplishments include closing the Iron Mind #3 hand gripper, lifting the 172 lb. Thomas Inch Challenge Dumbbell, and the ability to explode beer cans with the power of his hands.

A 1997 graduate of Walnut Hills High School in Cincinnati, Ohio, Wood originally began training his hands in preparation for High School football. This hand training was a large contributor to his football success and led him to a stint at Milford Academy Prep School in Milford, Connecticut and then as a scholarship athlete for the University of Michigan. He was a part of two Big Ten Championship teams for the Wolverines as well as a two-time letter winner.

Walnut Hills Eagles

Milford Academy Falcons

Michigan Wolverines
Wood graduated from the University of Michigan with an undergraduate degree in General Studies and more recently completed his Masters degree from the University of Michigan School of Information.

The New-Dad-No-Sleep-Workout

You may have noticed that updates have been a little sporadic as of late. You can thank this new 8 pound, 12 oz. bundle of joy:


How could anyone get anything done with this guy asleep on their chest? Now, if you were to ask me what the absolute worst thing someone can do for their training I’d tell you that it would be shortchanging sleep. Many people negate most of their potential gains by staying up all night playing video games or partyin’ at the club, in my case though it’s unavoidable, since the lil’ guy likes to eat every two hours or so. You may recall that P.B. (i.e. Pre-Baby) I often recommended early morning workouts… At the moment, that’s out: when I do end up rolling out of bed, I’m a zombie and the lifting of the weights is the last thing I feel like doing.

But I don’t want all that hard work over the years to slip away so I still gotta train…once the initial shock and awe of training under extreme conditions sets in, it’s just a matter of figuring out what you CAN do, within the given parameters and working from there.

In my case, I know that any training that I do MUST be brief and intense (even more so than usual.)As I mentioned previously, the concept here is to begin at an extremely manageable level and build from there. Such a scheme actually offers a great deal of flexibility since it can be adjusted as needed.

Fortunately, I’m much more alert later in in the day, usually a bit after supper time. My current workout is as follows:

1. The Michigan Bench Press Program
*(Day 1 or Day 2, alternated)

2. Hammer Strength High-Row
*(1 all-out set, generally high reps)

3. Secret Weapon Grip Machine: R/L hands
* (Severe Negatives, singles)

4. Neck Training
* (back/front, alternated by workout)

I was even able to get in some squats last Friday but that is a luxury that I don’t expect often. Otherwise, you can see that this workout is about as bare bones as it comes, but MAN does it leave me sore. I think this has to do with the fact that for 20 minute or so, I can ultimately focus on the training that is in front of me, but once that’s done, I have to devote it elsewhere (for obvious reasons.)

Despite the fact that conditions seem less than Ideal, I suspect that I may even come out of this thing with some surprising results.
You may have noticed that updates have been a little sporadic as of late. You can thank this new 8 pound, 12 oz. bundle of joy:


How could anyone get anything done with this guy asleep on their chest? Now, if you were to ask me what the absolute worst thing someone can do for their training I’d tell you that it would be shortchanging sleep. Many people negate most of their potential gains by staying up all night playing video games or partyin’ at the club, in my case though it’s unavoidable, since the lil’ guy likes to eat every two hours or so. You may recall that P.B. (i.e. Pre-Baby) I often recommended early morning workouts… At the moment, that’s out: when I do end up rolling out of bed, I’m a zombie and the lifting of the weights is the last thing I feel like doing.

But I don’t want all that hard work over the years to slip away so I still gotta train…once the initial shock and awe of training under extreme conditions sets in, it’s just a matter of figuring out what you CAN do, within the given parameters and working from there.

In my case, I know that any training that I do MUST be brief and intense (even more so than usual.)As I mentioned previously, the concept here is to begin at an extremely manageable level and build from there. Such a scheme actually offers a great deal of flexibility since it can be adjusted as needed.

Fortunately, I’m much more alert later in in the day, usually a bit after supper time. My current workout is as follows:

1. The Michigan Bench Press Program
*(Day 1 or Day 2, alternated)

2. Hammer Strength High-Row
*(1 all-out set, generally high reps)

3. Secret Weapon Grip Machine: R/L hands
* (Severe Negatives, singles)

4. Neck Training
* (back/front, alternated by workout)

I was even able to get in some squats last Friday but that is a luxury that I don’t expect often. Otherwise, you can see that this workout is about as bare bones as it comes, but MAN does it leave me sore. I think this has to do with the fact that for 20 minute or so, I can ultimately focus on the training that is in front of me, but once that’s done, I have to devote it elsewhere (for obvious reasons.)

Despite the fact that conditions seem less than Ideal, I suspect that I may even come out of this thing with some surprising results.

Handbalancing: Even Big Guys Can Do It

I’m about as far removed from a typical gymnast as you can get. Not only am I 6’5″ and very firmly in the heavyweight class, I’m also bottom-heavy (i.e. I carry a lot of weight in my legs) which makes me ill-suited to any type of handbalancing…yet I’ve still become pretty decent. Check this out:

The “Secrets” of handbalancing, if there are any, are simply knowing what to do and then putting in plenty of practice time. I’m not ready to run off and join the circus quite yet, but I can still impress the neighbors any time I want. Of course, handbalancing isn’t just about showing off, the upper-body strength and shoulder stability built through handbalancing have gone a long way toward improving pressing power and other facets of upper body strength — so it will pay to add some practice to your program.
I’m about as far removed from a typical gymnast as you can get. Not only am I 6’5″ and very firmly in the heavyweight class, I’m also bottom-heavy (i.e. I carry a lot of weight in my legs) which makes me ill-suited to any type of handbalancing…yet I’ve still become pretty decent. Check this out:

The “Secrets” of handbalancing, if there are any, are simply knowing what to do and then putting in plenty of practice time. I’m not ready to run off and join the circus quite yet, but I can still impress the neighbors any time I want. Of course, handbalancing isn’t just about showing off, the upper-body strength and shoulder stability built through handbalancing have gone a long way toward improving pressing power and other facets of upper body strength — so it will pay to add some practice to your program.